Dr Andrew McClelland

Senior Lecturer

PhD BPsych(Hons)
profile image

Since commencing work as an academic around 2009, Dr McClelland has primarily focussed on developing, coordinating and teaching into new graduate courses at various universities including a Master of Applied Positive Psychology with embedded Grad Dip and Grad Cert, a Graduate Diploma and Graduate Certificate of Coaching and Counselling, and a Master of Health and Social Wellbeing. During this time Dr McClelland has also supervised approximately 35 thesis students. He is currently developing at Cairnmillar a double Bachelor degree (Psychology and Counselling).

Expertise

Prior to working as an academic, Dr McClelland worked with many clients (groups and individuals) in his counselling/therapy and coaching practice, and in various mental health positions working with clients schizophrenia, mood disorders, and Autism Spectrum Disorder. He also spent many years developing and running extended workshops for adults with depression and anxiety, and 8-day personal leadership programs for teenagers at risk.

Teaching Research Interests

Dr McClelland has a strong interest in working with students to develop a range of skills, empirical knowledge and research to work professionally and effectively with clients across a range of domains. His broad teaching, research and personal interests include individual and collective wellbeing and resilience; thriving communities; developing healthier societies; environmental care; integrative approaches to health; healthy leadership; interconnected (ecological) factors for wellbeing; resentment and forgiveness (psychophysiological factors), and psychophysiological responses to provocation. At a more micro level, Dr McClelland has been developing and researching self-administered techniques for reducing food cravings and anxiety/panic.

Recent Publications and Presentations

  • In production: McClelland, A., & Weil, R. A comparison of the effects of visuo-spatial and non-visuospatial distraction tasks on self-induced food cravings in men and women with grade 3 obesity, and a non-obese sample.
  • Martin, P., Reece, J., Lauder, S., & McClelland, A. (2011). A randomised controlled trial of a social support intervention, Applied Psychology: Health and Wellbeing, 3(1), 44-65.
  • McClelland, A.B., Jones, K.V., & Douglas Gregg, M.E. (2009). Psychological and cumulative cardiovascular effects of repeated angry rumination and visuospatial suppression. International Journal of Psychophysiology, 74, 166-173.
  • Martin, P., Milgrom, J., & McClelland, A. (2008). Treatment manual: Comorbid Chronic Headache and Depression. Monash University/Southern Health.
  • McClelland, A., Kemps, E., & Tiggemann, M. (2006). Reduction of vividness and associated craving in personalized food imagery. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 62, 355-365.

* * * * *

  • Weil, R., Klebanov, S., Kovacs, B., & McClelland, A. (2014). Effects of simple distraction tasks on self-induced food cravings in men and women with grade 3 obesity. Obesity Week. The Obesity Society, and The American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. Atlanta, GA.
  • McClelland, A.B., Jones, K.V., & Douglas Gregg, M.E. (2008).  Psychological and cardiovascular effects of assertive and passive responding to provocation combined with rumination or distraction. “Heart and Mind” Psychogenic Heart Disease   Conference, Prato, Italy.
  • McClelland, A.B., Jones, K.V., & Douglas Gregg, M.E. (2008).  Psychological and cardiovascular effects of repeated rumination and distraction from rumination. 19th World Congress of Psychosomatic Medicine, Quebec, Canada.